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Small Hydroelectricity

 

Jackson Gulch small hydroTri-State is involved in various small-scale renewable hydropower projects. Small hydroelectric projects are generally considered to have capacities of less than 30 megawatts. They can be developed at existing dams where water is stored in a reservoir or they can be "run of river" facilities that rely on the natural flow of a river or canal.

 

Hydropower accounts for a substantial portion of Tri-State's generation portfolio; however, nearly all of that power is obtained through large-scale dam projects, such as Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona and Flaming Gorge Dam in Wyoming. Large-scale hydropower projects are not generally accepted as renewable or "green" energy.  As with any power generation project, the opportunity to develop or build more hydropower (small and large) sites is limited to the availability of potential sites.

 

 

Small Hydro projects under contract to Tri-State

 

 

Jackson Gulch Hydro

Location: near Mancos, Colo.

Operator: Mancos Water Conservancy District

Capacity/Output: 254 kilowatts (maximum); 152,630 kilowatt-hours (average)

 

 

Ridgway Hydro

Location: near Ridgway, Colo.

Operator: Tri-County Water Conservancy District

Capacity/Output: 8,000 kilowatts (maximum); 24,000,000 kilowatt-hours (average)

 

 

Vallecito Hydro

Location: near Bayfield, Colo.

Operator: Ptarmigan Resources and Energy

Capacity/Output: 5,224 kilowatts (maximum); 19,310,000 kilowatt-hours (average)

 

 

Williams Fork Hydro

Location: near Kremmling, Colo.

Operator: Denver Water Board

Capacity/Output: 3,600 kilowatts (maximum); 10,000,000 kilowatt-hours (average)

 

 

 

 

 
 
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